Community Development Finance

The community development industry’s capital requirements are significant. The financing tools that deliver this capital range from public subsidy programs, to grants, to private investment. This initiative seeks to catalogue these tools, explore complex and innovative deals, and promote new financing approaches that fill existing gaps. The goal of the initiative is to serve as a clearinghouse for issues related specifically to community development finance and to build the field’s capacity to raise, leverage, and efficiently use capital.

Publications

Pay for Success Financing
Community Development Investment Review, Volume 9, Issue 1, 2013

The New Family Philanthropy: Investing for Social and Environmental Change
Working Paper 2013-04 (August 2013)

Investing in What Works for America’s Communities: Essays on People, Place, and Purpose (2012)

Credit Unions, Community Development, and the Great Recession
Working Paper, 2012-01 (February 2012)

Suburbanization of Poverty in the Bay Area
Research Brief (January 2012)

Advancing Social Impact Investments through Measurement
Community Development Investment Review, Volume 7, Issue 2, 2011

Urban Sustainability and Community Development: Creating Healthy Sustainable Urban Communities
Working Paper, 2011-03 (February 2011)

Community Development in Practice
Community Investments: Volume 23, Issue 1, 2011

International Community Development
Community Development Investment Review, Volume 7, Issue 1, 2011

Charter School Tax Credit: Investing in Human Capital
Working Paper, 2010-08 (December 2010)

Enhancing New Markets Tax Credit Pipeline Flow: Maintaining a Continuous Deal Flow In Spite of Funding Gaps and Market Volatility
Working Paper, 2010-06 (October 2010)

CDFIs and Transit-Oriented Development
Special Report (October 2010)

Transit-Oriented Development
Community Investments: Volume 22, Issue 2, 2010

Place-Based Initiatives
Community Investments: Volume 22, Issue 1, 2010

Resources

Investment Vehicles

This page offers in-depth descriptions of eight vehicles that are among the most common community development investments.