National Stability

Small-Size Currency: 
Standards and Uniformity

With the rapid growth of our nation, there was a demand for more currency. During the 1920s, the U.S. Treasury realized that millions of dollars could be saved by replacing large-size bills with smaller bills. The currency most familiar to Americans and to the world today, Small-Size Currency has been issued since 1929 in many forms: Legal Tender notes, Silver Certificates, Gold Certificates, Federal Reserve notes, National Bank notes, and Federal Reserve Bank notes.

Legal Tender Notes

Legal Tender Note, $2, 1928

Legal Tender Notes

Legal Tender Note, $1, 1928

Legal Tender Notes

Legal Tender Note, $2, 1963

Legal Tender Notes

Legal Tender Note, $5, 1928

Legal Tender Notes

Legal Tender Note, $100, 1966

Gold and Silver Certificates

Silver Certificate, $1, 1928

Gold and Silver Certificates

Silver Certificate, $50, 1928

Gold and Silver Certificates

Silver Certificate, $100, 1934

Gold and Silver Certificates

Legal Tender Note, $100, 1928

Gold and Silver Certificates

Gold Certificate, $1,000, 1928

Gold and Silver Certificates

Silver Certificate, $1, 1934

Gold and Silver Certificates

Silver Certificate, $5, 1934

Gold and Silver Certificates

Gold Certificate, $10, 1928

Gold and Silver Certificates

Gold Certificate, $20, 1928

Gold and Silver Certificates

Silver Certificate, $10, 1933

Gold and Silver Certificates

Silver Certificate, $10, 1934

Federal Reserve Bank Notes

Federal Reserve Bank Note, $50, 1929

Federal Reserve Bank Notes

Federal Reserve Bank Note, $100, 1929

Federal Reserve Bank Notes

Federal Reserve Bank Note, $5, 1929

Federal Reserve Bank Notes

Federal Reserve Bank Note, $10, 1929

Federal Reserve Bank Notes

Federal Reserve Bank Note, $20, 1929

Federal Reserve Bank Notes

Federal Reserve Bank Note, $50, 1929

Federal Reserve Bank Notes

Federal Reserve Bank Note, $100, 1929