Showcase of Bills

Independence: Colonial Currency, Massachusetts, 12 pence, 1776
Independence: Colonial Currency, Massachusetts, 12 pence, 1776

Independence: Colonial Currency, Massachusetts, 12 pence, 1776

Colonists traded via barter or with notes printed locally using British denominations. This note includes an image of the “sacred cod” of Massachusetts. Found commonly in Massachusetts imagery of the era, the cod symbolized the importance of the fishing industry to the region’s economy.

Independence: Continental Currency, one-third dollar, 1776
Independence: Continental Currency, one-third dollar, 1776

Independence: Continental Currency, one-third dollar, 1776

Benjamin Franklin designed this note, which was issued by the Continental Congress to finance the American Revolution. The front depicts a sundial and the words, “Fugio. Mind your business,” while the back features an endless chain of thirteen links and the words, “American Congress we are one.” Backed by Spanish milled dollars which the Continental Congress planned to collect in four tax installments after victory, “Continentals” were an early symbol of state unification. The notes depreciated, however, to the point that it cost more to print than buy them, giving rise to the expression, “not worth a Continental.”

Independence: Colonial Currency, Georgia, $4, 1776
Independence: Colonial Currency, Georgia, $4, 1776

Independence: Colonial Currency, Georgia, $4, 1776

Colonial Currency was redeemable in a variety of units, with exchange rates needed when traveling from one colony to another. This example from Georgia was issued in Spanish milled dollars and features a Latin motto translating to: “Freedom is more precious than gold.” The cornucopia of abundance (right) is joined by a caduceus (left). While in modern times we think of this as a symbol of medicine, in the seventeenth century the caduceus was known as an ancient symbol of commerce and associated with Hermes, the Greek messenger god who was the protector of merchants. Reinforcing the freedom motto, the Liberty Cap motif in the center was a well known symbol of freedom during the colonial era, representative of a style of hat given to newly freed slaves in ancient Rome to signal their new status.

Independence: Colonial Currency, Pennsylvania, 4 pounds, 1777
Independence: Colonial Currency, Pennsylvania, 4 pounds, 1777

Independence: Colonial Currency, Pennsylvania, 4 pounds, 1777

“To Counterfeit is Death” was inscribed on many types of Colonial notes. In Colonial America capital punishment was carried out for counterfeiting, however other penalties included imprisonment and other forms of corporal punishment.

Westward Expansion: First Bank of the United States, $10, 1792
Westward Expansion: First Bank of the United States, $10, 1792

Westward Expansion: First Bank of the United States, $10, 1792

The Bank of the United States (today commonly known as the First Bank of the United States) was the country’s first central bank and issued notes in 1792 with the goal of creating a national currency.

Westward Expansion: Mormon Kirtland Note, $10, Ohio, 1837-1839
Westward Expansion: Mormon Kirtland Note, $10, Ohio, 1837-1839

Westward Expansion: Mormon Kirtland Note, $10, Ohio, 1837-1839

Joseph Smith founded a bank for the Mormon community in Kirtland, Ohio, in 1836. Although that particular bank failed in 1837, Mormon notes ultimately were universally accepted and their issuing banks considered to be extremely well-run.

Westward Expansion: Transportation Issue, Delaware Bridge Company, $1, 1836-1841
Westward Expansion: Transportation Issue, Delaware Bridge Company, $1, 1836-1841

Westward Expansion: Transportation Issue, Delaware Bridge Company, $1, 1836-1841

Many transportation notes, like this one issued in Lambertville, New Jersey, circulated during the Free Banking Era.

Westward Expansion: Private Issue, Peabody Ladies Furnishings, 3 cents 1862-1863
Westward Expansion: Private Issue, Peabody Ladies Furnishings, 3 cents 1862-1863

Westward Expansion: Private Issue, Peabody Ladies Furnishings, 3 cents 1862-1863

Issued in Memphis, Tennessee, this note is typical of the multitude of private bank notes issued during the Free Banking Era.

Westward Expansion: Private Bank Note, Mechanics Bank, $10, 1854
Westward Expansion: Private Bank Note, Mechanics Bank, $10, 1854

Westward Expansion: Private Bank Note, Mechanics Bank, $10, 1854

Issued in Memphis, Tennessee, this note is typical of the multitude of private bank notes issued during the Free Banking Era.

Westward Expansion: State Issue, Louisiana, $5, 1862
Westward Expansion: State Issue, Louisiana, $5, 1862

Westward Expansion: State Issue, Louisiana, $5, 1862

One year after this note was issued, President Lincoln signed the National Bank Act. The 1863 law attempted to create a uniform national currency and a strong national banking system.

Westward Expansion: Confederate Currency, $10, 1861
Westward Expansion: Confederate Currency, $10, 1861

Westward Expansion: Confederate Currency, $10, 1861

A slave picking cotton is depicted on this Confederate note. Confederate Currency was devalued by inflation during the Civil War as the blockaded Confederacy relied on currency issues for financing. Confederate currency became worthless after General Lee’s surrender.

Westward Expansion: Fractional Currency, 5 cents, 1864
Westward Expansion: Fractional Currency, 5 cents, 1864

Westward Expansion: Fractional Currency, 5 cents, 1864-1869

Spencer M. Clark, First Superintendent of the National Currency Bureau under President Abraham Lincoln, is depicted on this 5-cent fractional currency note. However, when Clark placed his image on this note he was already under investigation for embezzlement, fraud, and sexual harassment. Nineteen days later, Congress passed legislation banning the likeness of anyone living to be used on U.S. banknotes, stamps, or coins.

Westward Expansion: Demand Note, $10, 1861
Westward Expansion: Demand Note, $10, 1861

Westward Expansion: Demand Note, $10, 1861

Demand notes were issued in by acts of Congress in 1861 to finance the Civil War. The so-called “greenbacks” earned the nickname still familiar today because of the green color of their reverse side.

Westward Expansion: Postage Stamp, 1 cent, 1862-1863
Westward Expansion: Postage Stamp, 1 cent, 1862-1863

Westward Expansion: Postage Stamp, 1 cent, 1862-1863

Postage stamps, which served as a substitute for coins during the Civil War, were sometimes privately encased in brass with a mica shield to protect them from moisture. Many merchants used the back of the frame as an advertising medium and included embossed messages. This stamp’s front features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin. The back of the frame shows the commercial endorsement of Drake’s Plantation.

Westward Expansion: Compound Interest Note, $10, 1864
Westward Expansion: Compound Interest Note, $10, 1864

Westward Expansion: Compound Interest Note, $10, 1864

A portrait of Salmon Chase, the Secretary of the Treasury under President Lincoln, is seen to the left. At right, an allegorical figure representing Peace. Compound Interest Treasury Notes are very rare. These were circulating notes authorized by Congress which earned interest for three years, compounded every six months. These unique issues in 1863 and 1864 were an attempt to respond to the public need for money by a government already burdened by the enormous expenses of the Civil War.

Industrial Revolution: Legal Tender Note, $10, 1880
Industrial Revolution: Legal Tender Note, $10, 1880

Industrial Revolution: Legal Tender Note, $10, 1880

Pocahontas is depicted in an engraving of the painting “Introduction of the Old World to the New World” or “Pocahontas Presented at Court” by T.A. Liebler. Many Legal tender notes depicted scenes reflecting westward expansion to the new frontier.

Westward Expansion: Legal Tender Note, $10, 1901
Westward Expansion: Legal Tender Note, $10, 1901

Westward Expansion: Legal Tender Note, $10, 1901

The bison pictured on this note between portraits of explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark symbolizes the strength and pioneer spirit of the American West. Numismatists disagree on whether the bison is Black Diamond, the animal on the reverse of the Indian Head nickel, or Pablo, a bison which resided at the Washington Zoo.

Westward Expansion: National Bank Note, National Bank of South Reading, Massachusetts, $2, 1865
Westward Expansion: National Bank Note, National Bank of South Reading, Massachusetts, $2, 1865

Westward Expansion: National Bank Note, National Bank of South Reading, Massachusetts, $2, 1865

This motif is sometimes referred to as the “lazy deuce” or “lazy two” due to the sideways configuration of the numeral two. First Charter National Bank notes were the first notes issued following the passage of the National Banking Act of 1863. National Bank notes were issued until 1929 by thousands of banks based on charters granted by the government under the terms of the Act. Numismatists consider National Bank notes to be among the most beautiful examples of American currency.

Westward Expansion: National Bank Note, First National Bank of Albuquerque, $50, 1912
Westward Expansion: National Bank Note, First National Bank of Albuquerque, $50, 1912

Westward Expansion: National Bank Note, First National Bank of Albuquerque, $50, 1912

National Bank notes depicted a variety of historic scenes such as Benjamin Franklin’s famous experiment with electricity using a kite and a key, or this example illustrating George Washington crossing the Delaware River. Many of the vignettes on National Bank Notes are depictions of famous paintings of American history. National Bank Notes form the most abundant series of American paper money; they were issued for several decades from the Civil War until after World War I.

Westward Expansion: National Bank Note, First National Bank of Seattle, $50, 1902
Westward Expansion: National Bank Note, First National Bank of Seattle, $50, 1902

Westward Expansion: National Bank Note, First National Bank of Seattle, $50, 1902

The locomotive, a symbol of westward expansion and economic growth, is depicted on this Third Charter National Bank Note. Continuing the Industrial Revolution theme, the figures on each side of the locomotive were designed by artist Ostrander Smith to represent the industries of mechanics and navigation.

Metal Standards: National Bank Note, First National Gold Bank of San Francisco, $10, 1870
Metal Standards: National Bank Note, First National Gold Bank of San Francisco, $10, 1870

Metal Standards: National Bank Note, First National Gold Bank of San Francisco, $10, 1870

In 1870, Congress authorized ten banks (nine located in California) to issue and circulate currency redeemable in gold in order to facilitate the numerous gold transactions resulting from the California Gold Rush.

Metal Standards: Treasury Coin Note, $1,000, 1890
Metal Standards: Treasury Coin Note, $1,000, 1890

Metal Standards: Treasury Coin Note, $1,000, 1890

Numismatists have nicknamed this extremely rare note the “Grand Watermelon” because of the intricately detailed zeros on the reverse side that resemble watermelons. Treasury Coin Notes were authorized by the Legal Tender Act of July 14, 1890. Treasury Coin Notes were redeemable in either gold or silver bullion at the discretion of the Secretary of the Treasury.

Metal Standards: Gold Certificate, $10,000, 1882
Metal Standards: Gold Certificate, $10,000, 1882

Metal Standards: Gold Certificate, $10,000, 1882

An extremely rare example of a Gold Certificate, this note is one of only two known to be in existence. The reverse side of Gold Certificates was printed in golden orange, symbolic of their redemption value in gold coin.

Metal Standards: Silver Certificate, $5, 1896
Metal Standards: Silver Certificate, $5, 1896

Metal Standards: Silver Certificate, $5, 1896

This third and final note in the Educational Series depicts an allegorical group showing Electricity as the dominate force in the world. This note was engraved by G.F.C. Smillie from a painting by Walter Schirlaw, with border elements designed by Thomas F. Morris. The reverse honors Civil War generals Ulysses S. Grant and Philip Sheridan. The Educational Series is widely considered by numismatists to be the most beautiful currency ever issued by the United States. This note was removed from circulation soon after issue, however. Explanations range from smearing ink from the dense intaglio printing, to the counters (corner numbers) being difficult to discern by bank tellers, to the partial nudity of the Electricity figure.

Metal Standards: Silver Certificate, $5, 1899
Metal Standards: Silver Certificate, $5, 1899

Metal Standards: Silver Certificate, $5, 1899

Sioux Chief Running Antelope is one of only two Native Americans depicted on U.S. paper currency.

Metal Standards: Silver Certificate, $1, 1886
Metal Standards: Silver Certificate, $1, 1886

Metal Standards: Silver Certificate, $1, 1886

This note is one of two designs featuring Martha Washington, the only woman to have her formal portrait on United States paper currency. The only other non-allegorical woman depicted on United States currency is Pocahontas, who also appears on two note designs as the central figure in historic scenes.

Metal Standards: Federal Reserve Note, $10,000, 1914
Metal Standards: Federal Reserve Note, $10,000, 1914

Metal Standards: Federal Reserve Note, $10,000, 1914

Salmon Chase, Secretary of the Treasury under President Lincoln, is featured on this note. The reverse features a detailed engraving of The Embarkation of the Pilgrims. The first issue of Federal Reserve Notes was authorized by the Federal Reserve Act of December 23, 1913. United States currency notes in denominations greater than $100 were formally discontinued in 1969.

Metal Standards: Federal Reserve Bank Note, $2, 1918
Metal Standards: Federal Reserve Bank Note, $2, 1918

Metal Standards: Federal Reserve Bank Note, $2, 1918

A battleship is depicted on the reverse side of this Federal Reserve note. The identity of the ship is widely accepted to be the New York, which saw action in both World War I and World War II. Some numismatists believe that the note’s depiction of the ship steaming left to right (west to east) was a message to the world that the United States was ready to return to defend freedom in Europe if necessary.

National Stability: Legal Tender Note, $2, 1928
National Stability: Legal Tender Note, $2, 1928

National Stability: Legal Tender Note, $2, 1928

The first United States $2 notes were issued by the federal government in 1862 and featured a portrait of the first Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton. Thomas Jefferson has appeared on all United States $2 notes since the 1869 series.

National Stability: Gold Certificate, $100, 1928
National Stability: Gold Certificate, $100, 1928

National Stability: Gold Certificate, $100, 1928

Six years after this note was issued, it was recalled. Executive Order 6102 of 1933 enforced limitations on gold ownership and trade by U.S. citizens; the related Gold Reserve Act of 1934 required Reserve Banks to surrender all gold and gold certificates. On April 24, 1964, Secretary of the Treasury C. Douglas Dillon removed all restrictions on the acquisition or holding of gold certificates and it is now legal to collect them. President Gerald Ford lifted the restriction on private ownership of gold bullion effective January 1, 1975.

National Stability: Federal Reserve Note, Hawaii, $10, 1941-1944
National Stability: Federal Reserve Note, Hawaii, $10, 1941-1944

National Stability: Federal Reserve Note, Hawaii, $10, 1941-1944

“Hawaii notes” were part of a special wartime issue. They were overprinted with the word “Hawaii” so they could be easily identified in the event that the enemy was able to obtain American currency.

National Stability: Allied Military Currency, Provisional French Currency, 50 francs
National Stability: Allied Military Currency, Provisional French Currency, 50 francs

National Stability: Allied Military Currency, Provisional French Currency, 50 francs

During times of war and conflict, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing has printed special products, including military payment certificates for American forces, Allied military currency, and postage stamps for a number of Allied countries.

World Standard: Federal Reserve Note, $5,000, 1934
World Standard: Federal Reserve Note, $5,000, 1934

World Standard: Federal Reserve Note, $5,000, 1934

This note features a portrait of James Madison, member of the Continental Congress and the fourth U.S. President. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing stopped printing notes with denominations greater than $100 in 1945 and stopped issuing them in 1969.

World Standard: Bank Transfer Note, $100,000, 1934
World Standard: Bank Transfer Note, $100,000, 1934

World Standard: Bank Transfer Note, $100,000, 1934

The largest currency note ever printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing was the $100,000 gold certificate, series 1934. These Bank Transfer notes were printed from December 18, 1934 through January 9, 1935, and were issued by the Treasurer of the United States to Federal Reserve Banks against an equal amount of gold bullion held by the Treasury. The central portrait honors Woodrow Wilson who signed the Federal Reserve Act of 1913; these notes were used only for transactions between Federal Reserve Banks.

+ References

Colonial Currency, Massachusetts, 12 Pence, 1776, Paper Money of the United States Page 218 states the image is courtesy of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco and clearly shows that the reverse side of this note shows a tree and the words Printed by John Gill (Reference 1) (Reference 2).

Continental Currency, one-third dollar, 1776. Illustration on page 213 of Paper Money of the United States states the image is courtesy of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco and clearly shows that note was printed by Hall & Sellers. Page 6 of Paper Money of the United States: “Beginning in mid-1775, the Continental Congress authorized the issuance of currency to finance the Revolutionary War. This became known as Continental Currency. The notes were redeemable in Spanish Milled Dollars but they depreciated to the point that they cost more to print.” Page 60, 61 of Greenback: “Hard redemption was planned in four installments of taxes after victory”. Page 62: “Franklin himself designed the mottoes and motifs on the four smallest bills, for fractions of a dollar. The first set was printed by Paul Revere.” Page 63: “Continentals sank like a stone as the British retreated and the rebellion now looked like a success. For everyone wondered now what on earth Congress would do or find to redeem the money.”

Colonial Currency, Georgia, $4, 1776 (Reference 1)  (Reference 2).

Colonial Currency, Pennsylvania, 4 pounds, 1777 (Reference).

First Bank of the United States, $10, 1792 (Reference).

Mormon Kirtland Note, $10, Ohio,1837-1839. Greenback Page 185 “The Mormon leader Joseph Smith started a bank for the convenience of the faithful in Kirkland, Ohio, in 1836. The bills he issued tended to leak out beyond the Mormon community, and the gentiles were annoyed when Smith refused to redeem them for hard cash. When a Pittsburgh banker sent some notes back for redemption, the bank president tartly replied that he had issued notes for the convenience of the people, and to redeem them would defeat the purpose. The bank failed in 1837, with forty thousand dollars in notes outstanding, a major reason for deteriorating relations between the Mormons and the gentiles of Illinois in 1837. Once the faithful had grasped the mechanism, and removed to the Promised Land, Mormon banks proved to be extremely well run, and their dollar bills were universally accepted.”

Transportation Issue, Delaware Bridge Company, $1, 1836-1841 (Reference 1) (Reference 2)(Reference 3).

Private Issue, Peabody Ladies Furnishings, 3 cents 1862-1863.  (Reference) Salem, MA- John P. Peabody Ladies Furnishing Store 2¢ Jan. 1, 1864. Peabody’s store was located at 220 Essex St. and this note was signed by Mr. Peabody. According to an ad he sold jewelry, silver ware, fans, perfumes, and toilet articles. The John P. Peabody residence at 15 Summer St. is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. J.H. Bufford, a lithographer in Boston, produced this note. Fine, torn.

Private Bank Note, Mechanics Bank, $10, 1854. See notes. Paper Money of the United States page 6: “…the United States was virtually blanketed by issues of State BankNotes. The country at this time was just beginning to prosper and grow, and it soon became apparent that there was insufficient money in actual circulation to meet the demands of trade and commerce. Consequently, the various States granted charters to many private banks in their jurisdiction, and b the terms of these State Charters the banks were authorized to print and circulate their own currency.”…onto concept of Broken Bank Notes…Note: There are MANY modern-day Mechanics Banks  (Reference). Many people today lack appreciation of the origin of the Bank’s name. The founders and original customers represented various trades, crafts and professions in which the African American community had achieved success and prominence, so “Mechanics” likely was derived from the legal term “mechanics lien” that grouped such occupations together. Additionally, most of North Carolina ‘s wealth at the turn of the 20 the century was based on the ownership of real property, especially farmland, hence the term “Farmers.” That means the name “Mechanics and Farmers” denotes that this Bank is an institution dedicated to serving all facets of the community.

State Issue, Louisiana, $5, 1862.  (Reference 1), (Reference 2). $5 Note with an allegorical representation of the South slaying the North. This note is known as the “lazy 5″ note because of the sideways 5 at the bottom of the note.

Confederate Currency, $10, 1861. Paper Money of the United States page 238. “On result of secession was the immediate hoarding of United States coins, requiring the printing of a paper currency. Christopher Memminger [the Treasurer for the Confederate States of America] instituted a monetary plan for the new republic, geared for a young nation at peace. However, within months, the nation was at war, which accelerated after the first battle of Manassas in July, 1861. Eventually, the Confederacy was blockaded and cut off from most of the world, making foreign trade almost impossible. To finance the war, the Confederacy made subsequent monetary issues, through 1864. The result was rampant inflation. At Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, the currency was worthless.”

Fractional Currency, 5 cents, 1864. See emails on file from Bureau of Engraving & Printing Office of Historical Research and from the American Numismatic Association. See also Greenback pages 244-245.

Demand Note, $10, 1861. Paper Money of the United States pages 6 and 11. “Soon after the Civil War began, the United States found itself in desperate need for money to finance the war. The only remedy that could be found was in an issue of paper money. Accordingly, Congress passed the Act of July 17, 1861 which permitted the Treasury Department to print and circulated paper money to the extent of 60 million dollars. “The term Greenback for United States paper money originated with the issue of the Demand Notes of 1861. Demand Notes are the first and earliest issue of United States currency as we know it. “Printed in green. The green reverses of the Demand Notes are the origin of the term ‘Greenback’ as applied to U.S. paper money in general.”

Postage Stamp, 1 cent, 1862-1863. Paper Money of the United States page 210: “Encased Postage Stamps.” Several paragraphs + identical illustration.

Compound Interest Note, $10, 1864. Paper Money of the United States page 35 (several paragraphs).

Legal Tender Note, $10, 1880.  (Reference 1)  (Reference 2)  (Reference 3), Paper Money of the United States pages 14-34

Legal Tender Note, $10, 1901 (Reference). American Buffalo pages 12-15. See email from American Buffalo author Steven Rinella. Paper Money of the United States page 23: “Bison between the explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark. There is dispute over whether the bison is Black Diamond, the animal on the reverse of the Indian Head nickel, or Pablo, a bison which resided at the Washington Zoo.”

National Bank Note, National Bank of South Reading, Massachusetts, $2, 1865. Paper Money of the United States page 77. “Notes of this period rank among the most beautiful examples of American currency. The obverses bear vignettes pertaining to America history or tradition; the reverses show some of the famous paintings on Americana that hang in the Capital at Washington.” Paper Money of the United States page 79. “Woman holding flag. This is the well known ‘Lazy 2’ note, so called because of the extreme horizontal shape of the 2.” Stack’s page 88.

National Bank Note, First National Bank of Albuquerque, $50, 1912. Paper Money of the United States pages 75, 87 (numerous paragraphs)  (Reference).

National Bank Note, First National Bank of Seattle, $50, 1902. Paper Money of the United States pages 103, 113: “Notes of the Third Charter Period”

National Bank Note, First National Gold Bank of San Francisco, $10, 1870. Paper Money of the United States page 133

Treasury Coin Note, $1,000, 1890. Stack’s page 69: “The ‘Watermelon’ notes of 1890 (so-called because of the shape of the zeros on the back) are among the most famous and most popular. In fact, the highest price ever realized by a piece of paper money at public auction is held by the $1,000 Watermelon we sold a few years ago.” Paper Money of the United States page 67: Treasury or Coin Notes: “The notes of the 1890 Series are especially attractive because of the intricate designs on the reverse. The 1890 notes are all rare today, especially in new condition. Paper Money of the United States page 74: “The Grand Watermelon. From the collection of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Only 25 notes are outstanding of this design.”

Gold Certificate, $10,000, 1882. Paper Money of the United States page 145 with photo of obverse and reverse. “Note illustrated from the collection of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Signatures Teehee and Burke. Extremely rare. Two known.” Paper Money of the United States page 136. “Gold Certificates are color and vivid and are among the most attractive of all currency issues. Their reverses are brilliant golden orange, symbolic of the gold coin they represent.”

Silver Certificate, $5, 1896. See emails from BEP Office of Historical Research and ANA Curator.

Silver Certificate, $5, 1899. Curators at the Smithsonian have confirmed that the war bonnet on this note is typical of those worn by numerous plains tribes of the day and cannot conclusively be identified with either the Sioux or the Pawnee tribe. See email from Smithsonian  (Reference).

Silver Certificate, $1, 1886  (Reference 1)  (Reference 2, Paper Money of the United States: pages 50, 51, 22, 82).

Federal Reserve Note, $10,000, 1914. Paper Money of the United States page 132  (Reference).

Federal Reserve Bank Note, $2, 1918.  (Reference 1)  (Reference 2),  (Reference 3).

Legal Tender Note, $2, 1928  (Reference).

Gold Certificate, $100, 1928. Paper Money of the United States page 208: “Gold Certificates. All are now obsolete. The issue was short lived as the Gold Reserve Act of 1933 required the surrender of all gold certificates. On April 24, 1964 Secretary of the Treasury C. Douglas Dillon removed all restrictions on the acquisition or holding of gold certificates and it is now legal to collect them.”  (Reference 1) (Reference 2)   (Reference 3)  (Reference 4),

Federal Reserve Note, Hawaii, $10, 1934 (Reference 1)  (Reference 2).

Allied Military Currency, Provisional French Currency, 50 francs (Reference 1)  (Reference 2).

Federal Reserve Note, $5,000, 1934 (Reference 1)  (Reference 2).

Bank Transfer Note, $100,000, 1934 (Reference 1)  (Reference 2).