Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

Community Development

Publications

Community Development Investment Review

Published by the Center for Community Development Investments, the Review bridges the gap between theory and practice, from as many viewpoints as possible: government, nonprofits, financial institutions, and beneficiaries.

The Green Issue

This issue of the Community Development Investment Review highlights a number of deliberate, innovative interdisciplinary efforts that seek to concurrently and holistically address community development and environmental issues. Many of them focus on cities and their surroundings. They are diverse in the combination of issues they touch and address including air quality, climate change, water access on the environmental side, and education, health, and affordable housing on the community development side, and they are diverse in their range of approaches and partnerships.

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Community Development Research Briefs

Research Briefs feature data and commentary on emerging community development trends.

Following the aftermath of the Great Recession, national indicators are starting to show signs of improvement in the housing market. However, such indicators mask the realities of what’s happening on the ground in low- and moderate-income (LMI) communities that were disproportionately affected by the housing crisis.

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Community Investments

This quarterly publication focuses on community development issues and innovative solutions relevant to communities within the Federal Reserve’s 12th District.

Rebalancing the American Dream: Forging Pathways to Financial Security

Accumulated wealth and diversified savings can be far more important than income for keeping household finances stable through volatile shifts in the economy. The damaging impact of the foreclosure crisis and recession on homeownership brought this point into stark relief. Many financially-constrained households concentrate their wealth solely in their homes, and the broader housing market upheaval changed the prospects for prosperity for those Americans whose hold on financial stability was tenuous at best. By further diversifying their assets beyond physical property alone, low- and moderate-income homeowners may be able to better maintain long-term financial security. It is also important to acknowledge that homeownership is not a viable or preferred asset building option for some Americans. For all of these households, a continuum of wealth building approaches beyond homeownership offers opportunities to establish, diversify, and grow their asset portfolio. This issue of Community Investments focuses on the efforts that help households build on their earnings and invest in their future. Highlighted here are programs and policies that expand consumer access to more affordable financial products; support renters in building their credit history; and provide assistance to families investing in their futures through children’s savings accounts, entrepreneurship, and retirement.

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Vantage Point

The Community Indicators Project collects input from community stakeholders about the issues and trends facing low- and moderate-income communities in the 12th District.

This issue of Vantage Point synthesizes the key themes that emerged in the 2013 community indicators survey based on the responses of 289 expert stakeholders from the 12th District.

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Working Papers

Working papers provide in-depth analysis of new community development issues from practitioners and scholars.

2014-01

This paper demonstrates that the greatest reduction in health care costs after placement in supportive housing is seen among chronically homeless adults and seniors who are frequent users of the health care system. Employing data from Mission Creek Apartments, a senior affordable housing project in San Francisco with 51 units reserved for homeless seniors, the researchers estimated savings to Medicaid and Medicare from avoiding placing these seniors in a skilled nursing facility of $9.2 million over 7 years. Their findings support the conclusion that permanent supportive housing can be a highly cost-effective placement option for homeless seniors exiting skilled nursing facilities, particularly as they approach the end of life, and points to the importance of this housing option for managed care organizations that are increasingly taking on the financial responsibility for the health care of this population.

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Special Publications

A collection of topic-specific publications that takes an in-depth look at relevant community development issues.

Financial and Operational Ratios and Trends of Community Health Centers

This report provides an operational and financial overview of the community health center industry for the years 2008 – 2011. Prepared with the goal of increasing the information available to lenders and investors on community health centers nationwide, this document is the second of a series of studies supported by Citi Foundation, which will further illuminate the financial and operational trends of this group of organizations.

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