Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

Economic Research

Publications and Research Working Papers

FRBSF Economic Letters

Economic analysis and research summaries for a general audience.


Daniel J. Wilson
2015-06

State and local governments frequently offer tax incentives to attract businesses to locate in their area. Proponents view these incentives as a valuable tool to encourage economic development. Critics, on the other hand, argue either that incentives have little effect on business location decisions—and hence are wasteful giveaways—or that their benefits come at the expense of reduced economic activity in other areas. A key element in this debate is distinguishing what is best from a local versus a national perspective.

View past FRBSF Economic Letters
Subscribe

Economic Review

An annual summary of Department research plus in-depth policy article.

FedViews

Analysis of current economic developments and the outlook.

Simon Kwan, senior research advisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, states his views on the current economy and the outlook.

View past FedViews
Subscribe

SF Fed Forecast Preview

The SF Fed Forecast Preview is an advance release of the monthly SF Fed FedViews publication. Our forecasts of GDP, inflation, and unemployment will usually be released will usually be released on the second Tuesday of each month.

Western Economic Developments

Western Economic Developments is linked to via Fed in Print only.

  • Executive Summary
  • District Update
  • Nonresidential Real Estate and Construction
  • Alaska, Oregon, and Washington
  • Arizona, California, and Hawaii
  • Idaho, Nevada, and Utah

Executive Summary

  • California’s economy continued to expand at a strong pace in late 1996, and the state’s labor market tightened further.
  • Nevada, the fastest-growing state in the nation, continued to add jobs at more than a 6-1/2 percent average annual pace in recent months.

    View past Western Economic Developments

Working Papers

Preliminary versions of economic research.


Andrew K. Rose and Mark M. Spiegel

We explore the relationship between inflation and the bond market. Bond holders are exposed to capital losses through inflation and represent a potential anti-inflationary force; we ask whether their influence is apparent using a simple theoretical model where bond issuance leads to political pressure on the government to choose a lower inflation rate. We then check empirical data before and after the introduction of a domestic bond market. Inflation-targeting countries with a bond market experience inflation approximately 3-4 percentage points lower than those without one.

View past Working Papers
Subscribe