State Investment Tax Incentives: What Are the Facts?

Authors

Robert S. Chirinko

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2006-49 | November 1, 2006

There is an ongoing debate in the U.S. among policymakers and the courts concerning the practical effects of state investment tax incentives. However, this debate often suffers from a lack of clear information on the extent of such incentives among states and how these incentives have evolved over time. This paper takes a first step toward addressing this shortcoming. Compiling information from all 50 states and the District of Columbia over the past 40 years, we are able to paint a picture of the variation in state investment tax incentives across states and over time. In particular, we document three stylized facts: (1) Over the last 40 years, state investment tax incentives have become increasingly large and increasingly common among states; (2) these incentives, as well as the level of the overall after-tax price of capital, are to a large extent clustered in certain regions of the country; and (3) states that enact investment tax credits tend to do so around the same time as their neighboring states.

Article Citation

Wilson, Daniel J., and Robert S. Chirinko. 2006. “State Investment Tax Incentives: What Are the Facts?,” Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco Working Paper 2006-49. Available at https://doi.org/10.24148/wp2006-49

About the Author
Daniel Wilson
Daniel Wilson is a vice president in the Economic Research Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Learn more about Daniel Wilson