Publications

Publications

Community Development Innovation Review

The Community Development Innovation Review focuses on bridging the gap between theory and practice, from as many viewpoints as possible. The goal of this journal is to promote cross-sector dialogue around a range of emerging issues and related investments that advance economic resilience and mobility for low- and moderate-income communities.

Understanding Community Development Financial Institutions and their Impact in Low- and Moderate-Income Neighborhoods

This issue of the Community Development Innovation Review is a collection of research papers designed to expand our understanding of Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs) and their impacts in vulnerable communities across the country.

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Community Development Research Briefs

Research Briefs feature data and commentary on emerging community development trends.

Many residents of the San Francisco Bay Area have struggled to afford housing, particularly in places that enable economic opportunity. In this report, we find that housing unaffordability in the Bay Area prior to the COVID-19 crisis resulted in residential instability for many residents, as they faced moves, complex tradeoffs, and constrained choices in housing. These patterns held for all except those with high-socioeconomic status, regardless of whether their neighborhoods were gentrifying.

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Community Investments

This quarterly publication focuses on community development issues and innovative solutions relevant to communities within the Federal Reserve’s 12th District.

Veterans and Community Development

In this issue of Community Investments, we look into some of the reasons why we are seeing a degree of disconnection between what veterans need and the resources available to them. As we consider how the public can address these missing links, this issue’s articles provide evidence from local initiatives demonstrating effective ways for communities to recognize, support, and collaborate with veterans in the arenas of employment, housing, education, and financial stability. Many of the efforts presented here also highlight the ways in which veterans themselves are serving and supporting their fellow veterans and their broader communities.

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Open Source Solutions

The Open Source Solutions series highlights innovative community development ideas offered by experts from across the field.

A slate of multisite, cross-sector initiatives has emerged to address structural root causes of inequities by changing the systems that shape community conditions and individual well-being. This report reflects on recent progress and shortcomings and provides strategies to drive systems change forward. The findings highlight the complex intersections of systems, racial equity, and power that can work for or against systems change.

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Vantage Point

The Community Indicators Project collects input from community stakeholders about the issues and trends facing low- and moderate-income communities in the 12th District.

Working Papers

Working papers provide in-depth analysis of new community development issues from practitioners and scholars.

In this report, we examine neighborhood change and residential instability in the City of Oakland over the past two decades, employing historical and contemporary data. Our results show that lower-SES residents experience residential instability in different ways in different parts of Oakland, suggesting the need for more targeted strategies.

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Special Publications

A collection of topic-specific publications that takes an in-depth look at relevant community development issues.

Community Close-Up: The “Donut Kids” of California

Community Close-Up is a photo series highlighting the experiences of people who make up our economy and stories of resilience from communities facing economic hardship. The latest in the series centers the voices and experiences of “donut kids”—a term coined by the children of Cambodian-American donut shop owners to acknowledge their shared identities growing up in and around donut shops.

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